AP World History Syllabus

Advanced Placement World History Syllabus

 

World History requires the development of thinking skills using the processes and tools that historians employ in order to create historical narrative. Students will also be required to think on many different geographical and temporal scales in order to compare historical events over time and space. Advanced Placement (AP) World History is structured around the investigation of five themes woven into 19 key concepts covering six distinct chronological periods. History is a sophisticated quest for meaning about the past, beyond the effort to collect and memorize information. This course will continue to deal with the facts—names, chronology, and events—but it will also emphasize historical analysis. This will be accomplished by focusing on four historical thinking skills:
I. Chronological Reasoning
II. Comparison and Contextualization
III. Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence
IV. Historical Interpretation and Synthesis
Course Textbooks and Other Readings

Main Textbook:

• Stearns, Peter, Michael Adas, and Stuart B. Schwartz. World Civilizations: The Global Experience. 3rd ed. New York: Longman, 2001.
Other Textbooks (selected chapters):
• Bentley, Jerry and Herbert Ziegler. Traditions & Encounters: A Global Perspective on the Past. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011. 

Themes and AP World History
Students in this course are challenged to view history thematically and thereby discern patterns in human society across regions and over time. The AP World History course is organized around five overarching themes that serve as unifying threads throughout the course, helping students to relate what is particular about each time period or society to a “big picture” of history. The themes also provide a way to organize comparisons and analyze change and continuity over time. Throughout the year, students will have activities or projects in which they explore these themes and relate material in the course to these themes.
Theme 1: Interaction Between Humans and the Environment (ENV)
• Demography and disease
• Migration
• Patterns of settlement
• Technology

Theme 2: Development and Interaction of Cultures (CUL)
• Religions
• Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies
• Science and technology
• The arts and architecture

Theme 3: State Building, Expansion, and Conflict (SB)
• Political structures and forms of governance
• Empires
• Nations and nationalism
• Revolts and revolutions
• Regional, interregional, and global structures and organizations

Theme 4: Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems (ECON)
• Agricultural and pastoral production
• Trade and commerce
• Labor systems
• Industrialization
• Capitalism and socialism

Theme 5: Development and Transformation of Social Structures (SOC)
• Gender roles and relations
• Family and kinship
• Racial and ethnic constructions
• Social and economic classes


World History AP Pacing Guide
Period: 1
Dates: 8000 B.C.E. to 600 B.C.E. 
Days: 5

Period: 2
Dates: 600 B.C.E. to 600 C.E. 
Days: 35

Period: 3
Dates: 600 C.E. to 1450 C.E. 
Days: 40

Period: 4
Dates: 1450 C.E. to 1750 C.E. 
Days: 25

Period: 5
Dates: 1750 C.E. to 1900 C.E. 
Days: 25

Period: 6
Dates: 1900 C.E. to present 
Days: 25

Exam Review: 7 days

World History AP Course Plan
Period 1: Technological and Environmental Transformations, 8000 B.C.E. to 600 B.C.E.
Key Concepts:
1.1 Big Geography and the Peopling of the Earth
1.2 The Neolithic Revolution and Early Agricultural Societies
1.3 The Development and Interactions of Early Agricultural, Pastoral, and Urban Societies
Key terms:
• Paleolithic
• Neolithic Revolution
• Patriarchy
• Pastoralism
• Metallurgy
• “Civilization”
• Specialization of labor
• Mesopotamia
• Egypt
• Mohenjo Daro and Harappa
• Shang
• Olmecs
• Chauvin
• Composite bows
• Chariots
• Hittites
• Cuneiform
• Hammurabi’s Code
• Vedic
• Hebrews
• Zoroastrianism
• Ziggurats
• Mesopotamian Egyptian trade routes

Period 2: Organization and Reorganization of Human Society, 600 B.C.E. to 600 C.E.
Key Concepts:
2.1 The Development and Codification of Religious and Cultural Traditions
2.2 The Development of States and Empires
2.3 Emergence of Interregional Networks of Communication and Exchange
Key Terms:
• Diaspora
• Caste
• Hinduism
• Brahma
• Buddha
• Sutras
• Ashoka 
• Confucius
• Daoism
• Hellenistic
• Filial piety
• Monasticism
• Shamanism
• Animism
• Ancestor veneration
• Persian Empires
• Qin and Han empires
• Mauryan and Gupta empires
• Phoenicia
• Greek city-states
• Roman Empire
• Mayan Empire
• Teotihuacan
• Moche
• Chaco and Cahokia
• Sasanian
• Sepoy
• Persepolis
• Xiongnu
• White Huns
• Indian Ocean trade
• Monsoon winds
• Qanat system

Period 3: Regional and Interregional Interactions, 600 C.E. to 1450 C.E.
Key Concepts:
3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks
3.2 Continuity and Innovation of State Forms and Their Interactions
3.3 Increased Economic Productive Capacity and Its Consequences
Key Topics:
• Melaka
• Tenochtitlan
• Caravanserai
• Astrolabe
• Bills of exchange
• Hanseatic League
• Grand Canal
• Byzantine Empire
• Mongols
• Vikings
• Polynesians
• Bantu
• Islam
• Muhammad
• Ibn Battuta
• Neoconfucianism
• Al-Andalus
• Bubonic plague
• Fast ripening rice
• Caliphate
• Sui, Tang, and Song Dynasties
• Tributary system
• Feudalism
• Abbasids
• Horse collar
• Guids
• Mit’a
• Foot binding
 
Period 4: Global Interactions, 1450 C.E. to 1750 C.E.
Key Concepts:
4.1 Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange
4.2 New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production
4.3 State Consolidation and Imperial Expansion
Key Topics:
• Caravel
• Prince Henry
• Columbus
• Royal Charter companies
• Mercantilism
• Joint stock companies
• Columbian exchange
• Potatoes
• Maize
• Vodun
• The Palace of Versailles
• Encomienda
• Hacienda
• Creole
• Daimyo
• Safavid
• Casta paintings
• Gunpowder
• Manchu
• Mughal
• Ottoman
• Thirty Year’s War
• Little Ice Age
• The Reformation
Unit 9-13: 28 Days

Period 5: Industrialization and Global Integration, 1750 C.E. to 1900 C.E.
Key Concepts:
5.1 Industrialization and Global Capitalism
5.2 Imperialism and Nation-State Formation
5.3 Nationalism, Revolution, and Reform
Key Topics:
• The factory system
• The second Industrial Revolution
• Adam Smith
• John Stuart Mill
• Limited liability corporation
• Marxism
• Utopian socialism
• Tanzimat movement
• Self-strengthening
• Meiji Japan
• State socialism
• Imperialism
• Belgian Congo
• Social Darwinism
• Enlightenment
• Opium wars
• Montesquieu
• Locke
• Taiping’s Rebellion
• Haitian Revolution
• Latin American independence movements
• Maroon
• Sepoy Mutiny 1857
• Xhosa Cattle-Killing Movement
• Liberalism
• Socialism
• Communism 
• Feminism
• Indentured servitude
• Convict labor
• Chinese exclusion acts
 
Period 6: Accelerating Global Change and Realignments, 1900 C.E. to the Present
Key Concepts:
6.1 Science and the Environment
6.2 Global Conflicts and Their Consequences
6.3 New Conceptualization of Global Economy, Society, and Culture
Key Terms:
• Green Revolution
• Polio vaccine
• Cholera
• HIV/AIDS
• Alzheimer’s disease
• Air warfare
• Firebombing
• Dresden
• Fall of Ottoman Empire
• Fall of Russian Empire
• Fall of Qing Empire
• Indian Independence
• Algeria
• Vietnam
• Indian National Congress
• Ho Chi Minh
• Muhammad Ali Jinnah
• Pan-Africanism
• Communism
• India/Pakistan Partition
• Armenian genocide
• Total war
• Fascism
• Great Depression
• World War II
• Cold War
• NATO
• Warsaw Pact
• Proxy wars 
• Picasso’s Guernica
• Mohandas Gandhi
• Non-Aligned Movement (NAM)
• Tiananmen Square
• IRA
• The Great Leap Forward
• Fascist corporatist economy
• Nasser
• Deng Xiaoping
• The International Criminal Court
• World Bank
• European Economic Community
• Green belt
• Liberation Theology in Latin America
• Apartheid
• The Olympics

***This is not an all inclusive list of activities or assignments for the AP student.  All students are expected to read, read, and read some more.  After- school and possibly Saturday tutorials will be available prior to the AP Exam.